CIVICUS

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Last updated on 06.06.2019 at 14:19

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 Two activists linked to the band “Pussy Riot” to receive asylum in Sweden

Two activists linked to the band “Pussy Riot” to receive asylum in Sweden

Lusine Djanyan and Alexey Knedlyakovsky, two activists linked to the Russian protest group Pussy Riot, have received asylum status in Sweden.

Association

Lusine Djanyan and Alexey Knedlyakovsky, two activists linked to the Russian protest group Pussy Riot, have received asylum status in Sweden. The activists claim to have been receiving death threats and to have been exposed to “politically motivated” harassment. The asylum claim was filed in 2017 but it was first denied in 2018 by the Swedish immigration authorities. After appealing the 2018 ruling, the activists have now been granted asylum in 2019.

Djanyan told the Swedish broadcaster SVT: 

"I am happy that my children will grow up in safety, especially considering the developments at home".

Peaceful Assembly

The rights to assemble and protest are constitutionally protected. These rights may be limited only as prescribed by law, mainly on the grounds of public order and safety and only if necessary and proportionate.

The rights to assemble and protest are constitutionally protected. These rights may be limited only as prescribed by law, mainly on the grounds of public order and safety and only if necessary and proportionate. The legal framework establishes that either notification or formal authorisation for public assemblies is needed depending on the type of event. Prior authorisation is required for most of the cases and a week notice must be given to the police. Any restriction can be appealed to administrative courts. The Parliamentary Ombudsmen, who considers the issues relating to facilitation and protection of public assemblies, raised a number of concerns regarding the police conduct in moving protestors to a different location, halting protests without legal justification and terminating assemblies based on incidents of violence with some participants without first taking action against those individuals, for example in situations of counter-assemblies. Media is guaranteed access to public assemblies. Freedom of assembly has been in the news lately with demonstrations of far-right activists. Two incidents were reported in January 2016, one involving the attack by far-right demonstrators against onlookers and another one on the conduct of police during a non-authorised demonstration. In February, a man was shot during a pro-Kurdish demonstration.