CIVICUS

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Cape Verde

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Last updated on 01.06.2016 at 17:29

Cape Verde-Overview

People in Cabo Verde are free to express their opinions, form associations and demonstrate peacefully in public. They do this with strong guarantees in law and with protection from the state.

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Association in Cape Verde

People in Cabo Verde are free to form associations and the civil society sector has developed significantly since political reforms in the early 1990s.

People in Cabo Verde are free to form associations and the civil society sector has developed significantly since political reforms in the early 1990s. The freedom to form associations is guaranteed by Article 27 of the constitution, and regulated through a progressive law on non-profit associations which allows for associations to be both registered and unregistered. The authorities respect these provisions in practice and it is rare for an association’s registration to be refused or cancelled. Cabo Verdean CSOs work on a variety of causes including increasing respect for human rights, environmental protection, combatting drug trafficking and community development. A platform was created in 1996 to advance the interests of formal, registered nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), although Cabo Verde is also home to hundreds of other, less formalised civil society organisations, including community associations, mutual societies and cooperatives. Social movements, including two focussed on youth unemployment and a push for regionalisation, also operate freely and constitute an important part of Cabo Verde’s civil society.


Peaceful Assembly in Cape Verde

Freedom of peaceful assembly is guaranteed by Article 52 of the constitution, which provides that the organisers must simply notify the authorities that they intend to gather.

Freedom of peaceful assembly is guaranteed by Article 52 of the constitution, which provides that the organisers must simply notify the authorities that they intend to gather. No time or place restrictions are put on the exercise of this right, which is strictly observed by the authorities. On 30 March 2015, thousands of Cabo Verdeans protested on the streets of the major cities of Cape Verde responding to the call of the Civic Action Movement to denounce the planned increase in the salaries of political officers. The demonstrations were held peacefully and in response the president used his veto against the disputed text, pending its review.


Expression in Cape Verde

While the media sector is relatively small, it is dynamic and marked by real pluralism. Community and private radio and television stations operate alongside state-owned media.

While the media sector is relatively small, it is dynamic and marked by real pluralism. Community and private radio and television stations operate alongside state-owned media. Citizens and journalists alike enjoy freedom of opinion and they can work freely on sensitive issues including drug trafficking and immigration. The authorities encourage the use of social media and the Internet by citizens. Although only 40% of people accessed the Internet in 2014, access has grown rapidly and several areas in major cities have free Internet access. Articles 45 and 46 of the constitution guarantee freedom of expression, information and press freedom, rights which are respected in practice by the authorities, although permission is required for the publication of a newspaper. The Union of Journalists has criticised aspects of a new Electoral Code, which restrict the media’s ability to report freely on campaigns, candidates and political views for two months before an election takes place. Access to information by citizens is also facilitated, provided that the information requested does not concern the security or defence of the state.