Peaceful Assembly

Peaceful Assembly

People in Grenada are able to gather and demonstrate. The freedom of peaceful assembly is protected under the Constitution. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

The Public Order Act of 2013 replaced the colonial era 1959 Public Order Act, but 18 sections or sub-sections were found unconstitutional by the Constitutional Court in July 2015. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

The right to hold demonstrations is guaranteed to citizens under article 33 of the constitution. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

Article 11 of the Constitution also guarantees the freedom of assembly, with exceptions made on the grounds of defence, public safety, public order, public morality and public health. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

Although Article 10 of the Constitution provides for the right to freedom of peaceful assembly, peaceful protests are often violently disrupted and protestors attacked. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

Article 13 of the Constitution also upholds the freedom of assembly, with exceptions on the grounds of defence, public safety, public morality, public order and public health. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

Chapter 3 of the Constitution also recognises the freedom of assembly. This is generally upheld, although workers in parts of the public sector deemed essential have no right to take strike action. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

The freedom of peaceful assembly is recognised in Trinidad and Tobago’s constitution and also upheld in practice. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

Article 20 (1) of the Constitution of Tanzania guarantees the right of peaceful assembly. A notification must be provided to the police 48 hours before holding a demonstration. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

The right to protest is governed by the Law on Right to Assembly. Read more