CIVICUS

MonitorTracking civic space

Andorra

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Last updated on 14.04.2016 at 11:33

Overview

People in Andorra enjoy civic space that is unhindered by legal or practical impediments. Civic associations in Andorra are free to support a range of causes, from promoting women’s rights to stimulating economic debate and advocating for environmental protection.

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Association

Andorrans make the most of a healthy civic space, with over 400 officially-registered general associations, reflecting an incredibly vibrant civil society sector amongst the country’s small population. Organisations range from professional associations of estate agents to organisations like the Andorra Women’s Association, which carries out public advocacy around important social issues such as domestic and gender-based violence.

Andorrans make the most of a healthy civic space, with over 400 officially-registered general associations, reflecting an incredibly vibrant civil society sector amongst the country’s small population. Organisations range from professional associations of estate agents to organisations like the Andorra Women’s Association, which carries out public advocacy around important social issues such as domestic and gender-based violence. Organisations benefit from the protection of a strong rule of law. Article 17 of the Andorran constitution recognises the right to form associations for ‘a lawful purpose’ and a law from the year 2000 provides details on how associations should be formed and governed.

Peaceful Assembly

Andorrans are free to gather peacefully in public, a right that is underpinned by Article 16 of the constitution. Gatherings must however be for a ‘lawful purpose’ and organisers of public gatherings are also ‘required’ to notify authorities in advance.

Andorrans are free to gather peacefully in public, a right that is underpinned by Article 16 of the constitution. Gatherings must however be for a ‘lawful purpose’ and organisers of public gatherings are also ‘required’ to notify authorities in advance. Workers, however, do not benefit from a legally-protected right to strike in Andorra, although they are allowed to form unions.

Expression

A 2015 OSCE report confirms that Andorra’s media provides fair and balanced coverage of national events, including elections. The public broadcaster has adopted its own code of journalistic ethics. Andorrans also benefit from widespread, uncensored Internet access – according to the International Telecommunications Union, in 2014 over 95% of people in Andorra had access to the Internet.

A robust exchange of views on most topics takes place in Albania, both between individuals and through the media, although political bias and business influence does skew coverage, making reporting less impartial than it ought to be. Nevertheless, there are signs that the overall media environment is improving in Albania. An access to information law introduced in 2014 has also contributed to an improved situation. The Internet, which is now accessible by over 6 in 10 Albanians, is not censored by the state and has become an important platform for civil society organising and campaigning, as well as for the growth of the media sector.