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Algeria

Live rating: Repressed

Last updated on 14.06.2017 at 15:58

Algeria-Overview

In spite of progressive constitutional changes adopted by the Algerian parliament in early 2016, Algerian civil society operates in an environment highly restrictive to human rights.

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Minister vows to crush dissent "with an iron fist" ahead of elections

Minister vows to crush dissent "with an iron fist" ahead of elections

Algeria's interior minister used strong language to threaten those he perceives as destabilising the country amidst large-scale protests and boycotts.

Peaceful Assembly

Algerians are struggling as the country's economy slows and unemployment rises. Protests over the government's socio-economic plans took place throughout the country in the months leading up to the May 2017 parliamentary elections. Frustrated with poor governance and persistent economic problems, young people in particular have taken to the streets in various local protests, which have at times led to clashes with police. The authorities have thus far been unwilling to talk with the demonstrators, and instead, have reacted to the unrest by detaining participants and disrupting protests. Furthermore, in response to the protests, Algeria's Interior Minister, Noureddine Badawi has threatened to “strike with an iron fist whoever tries to destabilise the country’s security”.

In recent months, trade unions have also mobilised over labour-related issues in Algeria; however, the authorities in turn have disrupted union-related actions and prevented members from exercising their right to peaceful assembly. On 21st - 22nd March 2017, for example, police detained five leaders from the trade union - National Autonomous Union of Sonelgaz Gas and Electricity Workers (SNATEG) - to prevent them from participating in a protest march scheduled for the following day in Tizi Ouzou.

SNATEG organised a peaceful protest on 22nd March 2017 in the city of Bejaia, where thousands turned out to petition for better pay. In response to the demonstration, the police arrested 240 protesters, several of whom were injured during the arrests. 

Association

More than 200 SNATEG members planned a union meeting on 31st March at their headquarters but were forcefully dispersed by police. Police arrested and later released several SNATEG leaders in attendance, and other union members were interrogated and forced to leave the premises.  

Expression

Prior to the 4th May 2017 parliamentary elections, the Algerian government prohibited domestic media from reporting on organisations and political parties that were calling for a boycott of the elections due to concerns over the lack of transparency and fairness in the electoral process. 

In April, Algeria’s High Authority for Election Monitoring (HIISE) ruled that political parties must show the faces of female candidates on parliamentary election posters. Previously, female candidates' faces were excluded from electoral posters because of widely followed traditional norms. An HIISE official stated,

“This kind of exclusion is dangerous, illegal and unconstitutional, especially as these women are candidates going to represent the people. The citizen has the right to know the person to vote for”.

Algeria's main Islamist party, Movement of Society for Peace, however, declared the HIISE decision illegal and announced that candidates would file a court action if disqualified from the elections for not abiding by the HIISE ruling. 

Association

Algeria’s 2012 Law on Associations grants the government sweeping powers to regulate the activities of associations, and to refuse to register, re-register, or dissolve, them.

Algeria’s 2012 Law on Associations grants the government sweeping powers to regulate the activities of associations, and to refuse to register, re-register, or dissolve, them. The law further imposes unwarranted restrictions on the ability of associations to receive foreign funding, and imposes criminal liability, including fines, for members and leaders of associations. The 2012 law requires that associations that were previously lawfully registered seek and obtain re-registration. Human rights groups including the Algerian League for Human Rights (Ligue Algérienne des Droits de l’Homme, LADDH) and Youth Action Rally (Rassemblement Action Jeunesse, RAJ) have received no response when seeking re-registration.

Peaceful Assembly

The right to freedom of peaceful assembly is severely restricted in Algeria, in both law and practice.

The right to freedom of peaceful assembly is severely restricted in Algeria, in both law and practice. Under the country’s Penal Code, it is a criminal offence- punishable by imprisonment- to organise or take part in an unauthorised gathering. In the capital Algiers, a complete prohibition on protests remains in force. In February 2015, nine labor rights activists were convicted and imprisoned, for taking part in peaceful protests. In December 2015, seven peaceful protestors were sentenced to one-year prison terms for participating in demonstrations in Tamanrasset.

Expression

Algeria’s 2012 Law on Information places substantial restrictions on the ability of associations to publish and disseminate information.

Algeria’s 2012 Law on Information places substantial restrictions on the ability of associations to publish and disseminate information. The law specifically restricts freedom of expression and access to information relating to vague concepts including national identity, sovereignty, the economy, and national security. In June 2016, two staff members of a private television station working on a satirical news show were arrested, charged, and detained. Human rights defender Slimane Bouhafs of Movement for Self-Determination of Kabylia (MAK) is currently serving a three year prison sentence, on charges related to expressing his beliefs in Christianity. Several other human rights defenders have been arrested, detained and imprisoned. Journalists have been also arrested and charged, on grounds including “insulting state institutions” and “attacks intended to overthrow the regime”.