self censorship

Cuba: New legislation enables further control over online content, restricting freedom of expression

Cuban and international civil society organisations reiterated their concern over increased repression in the country one month after the anti-government demonstrations of 11th July 2021 (11J). In addition, on 17th August 2021, Cuba’s official diary Gaceta Oficial published the Decree-Law 35/2021 on Telecommunications, Information and Communication Technologies, and the Use of the Radio Spectrum. Read more  |  Read in Spanish

Cuba: New legislation enables further control over online content, restricting freedom of expression

Fear and self-censorship in Cuba following mass anti-government protests

After anti-government protests flared up across Cuba on 11th July 2021, rights group Cubalex reported that over 500 people had been detained or were reported missing in the context of the demonstrations. Read more  |  Read in Spanish

Fear and self-censorship in Cuba following mass anti-government protests

Media independence, access to information and self-censorship of NGOs still an issue in Bhutan

There continue to be concerns about media independence, access to information and the chilling effect of defamation laws on journalists. Further, according to reports, NGOs continue to self-censor and avoid issues perceived as sensitive by the government. Read more

Media independence, access to information and self-censorship of NGOs still an issue in Bhutan

Stunning crackdown on civil society and opposition continues in Nicaragua

As previously reported on the Monitor, an unprecedented crackdown on opposition groups and human rights defenders was carried out by Nicaragua’s authorities in early June 2021. The wave of arrests continued over the month, with more leaders arrested on trumped-up charges. Read more

Stunning crackdown on civil society and opposition continues in Nicaragua

Crackdown on independent media outlets, lawyers and political activists continues

Freedom of expression and information are so tightly controlled in Tajikistan that it has become virtually impossible for journalists to cover issues which the authorities perceive to be “sensitive” without endangering their safety or that of their relatives. The authorities use legal provisions which punish incitement to hatred or discord or “spreading of false information” to silence critical voices and create a climate of fear. Apart from targeting independent journalists, state persecution is particularly aimed at human rights lawyers and political opponents.
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Crackdown on independent media outlets, lawyers and political activists continues

Brunei drops two places in global press freedom rankings

In April 2021, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) released its latest press freedom index. Brunei’s ranking dropped two places to 154 out of 180 countries. RSF reported that self-censorship is the rule for journalists working for state-owned Radio Television Brunei and for the leading daily newspapers, which are directly owned by the Sultan’s family.
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Brunei drops two places in global press freedom rankings

A deadly January in Colombia

The Special Jurisdiction for Peace (JEP) warned that January 2021 had been the most violent start to a year since the signing of the Peace Agreement between the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the Colombian State in 2016. Read more  |  Read in Spanish

A deadly January in Colombia

Journalist killed covering crime scene and several others threatened in Mexico

On 9th December 2020, Jaime Daniel Castaño Zacarías, a photojournalist and editor of PrensaLibreMx, was shot and killed by unidentified gunmen after he photographed two dead bodies found on the side of a highway in Jerez, Zacatecas state. Read more

Journalist killed covering crime scene and several others threatened in Mexico

Censoring critical voices: Social media giants fined; journalists, women HRDs behind bars

On 2nd October 2020, the Ministry of Interior announced as part of COVID-19 measures that activities held by NGOs, unions and cooperatives were required to be postponed until 1st December 2020. The Turkish President ordered the Turkish Medical Association (TTB) to be outlawed and its leadership prosecuted, accusing the association of terrorism after it criticised governments response to COVID-19. Several protests were staged by the association over this. In a separate development, after three waves of operations against it, eight women affiliated with Rosa Women’s Association were arrested while eight others were released on probation due to their work on womens rights. The imprisonment of journalist remains a concern with four journalists being detained following their repeated reports on an incident where two Kurdish villagers were allegedly tortured and thrown from a helicopter. In addition, journalist Ayşegül Doğan was convicted for "establishing an armed organisation" and sentenced to six years and three months in prison due to her reporting. In another act of censorship, Turkish authorities imposed fines of 10 million Turkish lira (one million Euros) to social media giants, including Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, for failing to comply with the new social media law. Read more

Censoring critical voices: Social media giants fined; journalists, women HRDs behind bars

Laws on Foreign Agents and Cybercrimes restrict civic space further in Nicaragua

On 15th October 2020, Nicaragua’s lawmakers approved the “Foreign Agents Law” which expands government powers to control and muzzle civil society. Read more

Laws on Foreign Agents and Cybercrimes restrict civic space further in Nicaragua