restrictive law

Ongoing persecution of unionists, media and opposition ahead of commune elections in Cambodia

In recent months, the harassment and persecution of NagaWorld unionists and workers has persisted. Licences were revoked for three digital media outlets while civil society groups remained concerned about the internet gateway sub-decree. Activists have been charged around land disputes while opposition activists continued to be criminalised or targeted ahead of the commune elections. Read more

Ongoing persecution of unionists, media and opposition ahead of commune elections in Cambodia

Uruguay: decline in freedom of expression; restrictive law maintained after referendum

Uruguay fell from 18th to 44th place in Reporters Without Borders’ World Press Freedom Index, despite the organisation’s analysis that the country’s “political climate encourages constructive and inclusive dialogue on the media’s role in national life.” Read more

Uruguay: decline in freedom of expression; restrictive law maintained after referendum

Indonesian authorities criminalise activists, violently suppress protests around Papua

In the last few months, human rights defenders have been arrested, criminalised and threatened, especially those speaking up on violations in the Papuan region. Those who organised or have been involved in protests against the creation of new provinces in Papua have also been arrested and ill-treated and some have faced excessive or deadly force from the security forces. Farmers and activists in Wadas were arrested for opposing a mining project. The press freedom ranking for Indonesia has dropped and digital repression continues to be reported. Read more

Indonesian authorities criminalise activists, violently suppress protests around Papua

Vietnamese activists face tax evasion charges, movement restrictions and increasing censorship

In recent months, civil society has documented the use of tax evasion laws to target activists, in particular those involved in a network of NGOs to monitor the implementation of the EU-Vietnam Free Trade Agreement (EVFTA). New reports highlight the restrictions on movement for activists as well as increased arrests of media workers and environmental activists. The Vietnamese government plans to adopt new regulations to tighten control over social media platforms, while journalists have been arrested and convicted for exposing abuses or for criticism of the state. Police have also failed to prevent plainclothes thugs from attacking land rights protesters.
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Vietnamese activists face tax evasion charges, movement restrictions and increasing censorship

Proposed law threatens CSO space, opposition faces brutal repression ahead of elections

Private Voluntary Organisations Amendment Bill Poses Serious Threats to Human Rights and Civic Space; President Mnangagwa Issues Stern Warning to Civil Society Actors; Police arrest Opposition Political Party Members for Election Campaigning; Popular CCC Supporter Arrested for ‘Improper Dressing’; Judiciary Overturns Several CCC political rally bans; Teachers Strike over Wage Increase; Opposition Political Party Rally attacked; Zimbabwe National Students Union Protest over Fee Hikes ; Trial of Clapaton Redi begins over insult charges Read more

Proposed law threatens CSO space, opposition faces brutal repression ahead of elections

Media Networks and Journalists Face Brutal Repression

Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad ratified the Cybercrime Law No. 20 of 2022, which includes penalties ranging from one month to 15 years in prison, while fines range from 200,000 to 15 million (approx. 26,700 EUR) Syrian pounds for a group of acts classified by the law as cybercrimes; the Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria—the regional government—announced that it was suspending Rudaw Media Network’s license to operate in north-eastern Syria; German court in the city of Frankfurt began hearing evidence in a trial involving allegations of torture and murder by state agents during Syria’s decade-long brutal armed conflict; Read more

Media Networks and Journalists Face Brutal Repression

Arrests of activists, journalists continue in Myanmar as military tribunals impose harsh sentences

In recent months, activists were arrested, faced fabricated charges - including of terrorism - and given harsh sentences including the death penalty, by secret military tribunals. According to reports, many activists had unfair trials and were tortured or ill-treated. Myanmar’s press freedom rankings dropped further according to Reporters Without Borders (RSF) and journalists continued to be criminalised on charges of “incitement, sedition and ‘terrorism’”. At least 26 writers were jailed in 2021. The junta also arrested dozens of activists for supporting the ‘silent strike’ around the one year anniversary of the coup. Read more

Arrests of activists, journalists continue in Myanmar as military tribunals impose harsh sentences

Kazakhstan: Civic space limited by continued fallout from January 2022 events

During the reporting period, the situation in Kazakhstan continued to be affected by the fallout from the January 2022 events, when mass protests for social and political change were met with excessive force by the authorities and parts of the crowd resorted to violence. Representatives of the international community have repeatedly expressed concerns about the human rights impact of these events and called for an effective and impartial investigation into them. Read more

Kazakhstan: Civic space limited by continued fallout from January 2022 events

Civic freedoms continue to deteriorate in the backdrop of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

Thousands arrested in anti-war protests in Russia; New law criminalises reporting on the war in Ukraine; CSOs denounce persecution of activist; Supreme Court affirms liquidation of Memorial International Read more

Civic freedoms continue to deteriorate in the backdrop of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

Panama: National Assembly debates bill to modify legislation on the right of reply

On 23rd March 2022, the National Assembly created a sub commission to analyse a bill (No.779) which seeks to modify the country’s law on the right of reply (Law 22 of 2005). If approved, the legislation would reduce the timeframe for media outlets to publish responses contemplated under this law and increase fines for non-compliance with this obligation. Read more

Panama: National Assembly debates bill to modify legislation on the right of reply