non state actors

Discriminatory citizenship law sparks a month of protests in India and brutal response from police

Over the last month, a divisive and discriminatory citizenship law has sparked widespread protests in India. It has been met with excessive force and deadly violence by the authorities, with at least 27 killed and hundreds injured. Critics of the law and activists have been arrested while there have been allegations of torture in detention by the police in Uttar Pradesh. The police also failed to protect attacks against students by a pro-government mob at Jawaharlal Nehru University. Read more

Discriminatory citizenship law sparks a month of protests in India and brutal response from police

Human rights defenders in Nicaragua subjected to criminalisation, defamation and harassment

A crackdown on protests in November 2019 has raised alarm in Nicaragua. On 14th November 2019, nine mothers of imprisoned opposition activists began a hunger strike in the San Miguel Church in Masaya, calling for the release of 130 people allegedly detained in the context of the protests. According to reports, the premises were quickly barricaded by police and pro-government groups, who cut off water and electricity. They were under siege for nine days. Activists who attempted to provide water and medicine to the strikers have been criminalised.

In addition, reports indicate the continuous harassment of human rights defenders and activists who have taken part in protests in the country. Finally, three Nicaraguan newspapers have decided to suspend publications due to the adverse environment in which they have had to operate. Read more  |  Read in Spanish

Human rights defenders in Nicaragua subjected to criminalisation, defamation and harassment

Concerns about freedom of expression in Nigeria: journalists arrested, protests repressed

According to the Amnesty International report 'Endangered Voices. Attack on Freedom of Expression in Nigeria', at least 19 journalists, bloggers and media practitioners have been subject to attacks between January and September 2019. These range from physical attacks, verbal assaults, death threats, surveillance, indiscriminate detention to pressure to reveal sources, mostly perpetrated by Nigerian security forces. Read more

Concerns about freedom of expression in Nigeria:  journalists arrested, protests repressed

Hong Kong protesters face arrests, excessive force and torture while journalists ill-treated

Over the last two months there have been continued reports of arbitrary arrests, brutal beatings and torture by the police, a ban on face masks and attacks on protest leaders and journalists. Further, protesters have been targeted by trolls on social media and Apple deleted a protest app. Read more

Hong Kong protesters face arrests, excessive force and torture while journalists ill-treated

Commission of inquiry slams human rights abuses ahead of elections

UN Commission of Inquiry on Burundi (CoI) concluded in its report, released on 4 September 2019, the existence of a climate of fear and intimidation for those who do not support the ruling party, controversy surrounds the killing of two opposition party members on 11 July 2019, while in police custody, At least one person was killed and 10 others wounded after fighting occurred between members of ruling CNDD-FDD party and those of the National Congress for Liberty (CNL) opposition party in Mubimbi commune, CSO PARCEM suspended by government, HRD Germain Rukuki's 32 year sentence upheld by Court of Appeal in his absence, BBC closes office until further notice Read more

Commission of inquiry slams human rights abuses ahead of elections

Philippines human rights body launches national inquiry as attacks against activists persist

Over the last few months, critics of the President have been charged with sedition and other offences and journalists have been killed. Further, a anti-fake news bill has been tabled in the Senate which could restrict freedom of expression. Left and indigenous activists have also been killed and there are increasing attacks on lawyers. Read more

Philippines human rights body launches national inquiry as attacks against activists persist

Kyrgyzstan: Journalists and media face threats, attacks as ex-president is arrested

This update covers developments concerning freedom of association, peaceful assembly and expression in Kyrgyzstan from the beginning of July to the beginning of October 2019. The International Partnership for Human Rights (IPHR) and the Legal Prosperity Foundation (LPF) have prepared the update within the framework of their cooperation with the CIVICUS Monitor. Read more

 Kyrgyzstan: Journalists and media face threats, attacks as ex-president is arrested

Journalists prosecuted, media outlets suspended

On 23rd September 2019, a court in N'Djamena sentenced journalist and editor for the quarterly Salam Info, Martin Inoua Doulguet, to a prison sentence of three years and a high fine of two million CFA francs (3,390 USD), to be paid jointly with co-accused Abdramane Boukar Koyom, editor of the satirical newspaper Le Moustik. The latter was not given a prison sentence. Read more  |  Read in French

Journalists prosecuted, media outlets suspended

Pro-government collectives continue to reinforce a hostile environment for dissenters in Venezuela

On 16th September 2019, around 400 teachers gathered in front of the Ministry of Education in Caracas to demand salary increases and the resignation of Minister Aristóbulo Istúriz. Alleged members of pro-government “colectivos” attempted to disrupt the protest, riding into the crowd on motorcycles and firing gunshots in the air. Dressed as civilians, these groups also threw water at demonstrators and beat up teachers who were participating. On 21st September, another attack by colectivos disrupted a demonstration supporting opposition leader Juan Guaidó.

This update covers events from 15th September to 26th September 2019. Read more

Pro-government collectives continue to reinforce a hostile environment for dissenters in Venezuela

Proposed legislation on workers’ strikes could limit Freedom of Peaceful Assembly in Costa Rica

On 3rd September 2019, several Costa Rican unions marched in San José to protest a draft bill (No. 21.049) proposing new regulations for strikes. Proponents of the regulation argue that current practices generate an insecure economic environment. But, as previously reported on the Monitor, opponents believe this new law to be overly authoritarian, limiting the right to peaceful assembly.

In a separate development, on 21st September 2019, senior citizen Norman del Valle was forcibly removed from the San Ramón Regional Museum after expressing critical views about Cuba’s regime during an event at the museum. Read more  |  Read in Spanish

Proposed legislation on workers’ strikes could limit Freedom of Peaceful Assembly in Costa Rica