prevention of protest

Lack of accountability for ‘’Bloody January’’ events & persecution of critics undermine pledged modernisation

The lack of justice and accountability for the ‘’Bloody January’’ 2022 events remained a key concern due to the failure of the authorities to impartially, thoroughly and effectively investigate allegations of excessive force, torture and ill-treatment, and other violations related to these events. For example, while 70 percent of those surveyed by KIBHR reported torture and ill-treatment in detention during the January events, only 15 law enforcement officials were under investigation for torture as of mid-August 2022. The first court proceedings against police officers facing such charges began in early September 2022. Hundreds of criminal cases related to the January events had been submitted to court as of August 2022, while other cases were pending trial. These cases include those of at least 30 civil society and opposition activists . The most high-profile activist case related to the January events is that of opposition Democratic Party leader Zhanbolat Mamai, who remained in pre-trial detention on multiple charges initiated in retaliation for his opposition activities Read more

Lack of accountability for ‘’Bloody January’’ events & persecution of critics undermine pledged modernisation

Journalists threatened and attacked; HRD detained; protest banned

In a statement by the social movement Balai Citoyen on 5 September 2022, member of their national coordination, Ollo Matthias Kambou, also known as Kamao, was abducted by unknown individuals. In a later statement, the social movement confirmed that Kambou had been detained by gendarmes. Although the motives for the arrest remain unclear at the time of writing, they might be related to his comments during a broadcast by Radio Oméga. The activist participated in a special programme organised by the radio station to evaluate the military authorities since the military coup of 24 January 2022. Read more  |  Read in French

Journalists threatened and attacked; HRD detained; protest banned

Nicaragua: closure of CSOs, community radio stations, and television cable channel

The repression and persecution of civil society organisations, religious groups, and independent press continues unabated. In recent months, leaders of the Roman Catholic Church were particularly targeted. Church representatives who attempted to mediate dialogues between the government and opposition in 2018 have been branded as “terrorists” by President Daniel Ortega. Read more  |  Read in Spanish

Nicaragua: closure of CSOs, community radio stations, and television cable channel

Civic freedoms restricted ahead of 24th August general elections

On 17th August 2022, police officers attempted to prevent a civil society protest from taking place in Luanda. The protest, organised by dozens of CSO's, aimed to protest irregularities in the electoral process for the upcoming general elections on 24th August 2022. Groups of protesters, spread out on the planned itinerary of the protest, were dispersed by police officers. Dozens of protesters, including VOA correspondent Coque Mukuta, were reportedly arrested. Read more

Civic freedoms restricted ahead of 24th August general elections

HRDs exposing rights violations in Anglophone regions subjected to death threats

Amnesty International issued a statement on 7 July 2022 regarding reports that at least seven human rights defenders and one cyber-activist had faced death threats as a result of exposing human rights violations in the two Anglophone regions of Cameroon – Northwest and Southwest regions – where clashes and violence have been taking place between government security forces and separatists since 2017. Over 6,000 people are estimated to have been killed, while over 765,000 people have been displaced in the conflict.

Read more  |  Read in French

HRDs exposing rights violations in Anglophone regions subjected to death threats

Several killed, injured, arrested in protest against the military junta’s “unilateral management of the transition”

Front National pour la Défence de la Constitution (FNDC), a coalition of political parties, civil society groups and trade unions, called for protests on 28th and 29th July 2022 in Conakry to demand more transparency in Guinea’s transition, as coordinated by the military junta. Protests also called for the establishment of an inclusive framework for dialogue. According to news reports, the military junta deployed the armed forces to maintain public order during the demonstrations, and security forces reportedly used tear gas to disperse protesters, while protesters responded by throwing stones and burning tyres. Some of the protests turned into violent clashes between protesters and security forces, particularly in the neighbourhoods of Bambèto, Sonfonia and on the route Le Prince, and which led to casualties, injuries,and dozens of arrests. Read more  |  Read in French

Several killed, injured, arrested in protest against the military junta’s “unilateral management of the transition”

Dozens of protesters arrested in women's 'Black Monday' protest against high fuel prices and cost of living

n the past few months, several protests have taken place in Sierra Leone over the increasing cost in fuel prices and overall economic hardship in the country.

On 4th July 2022, dozens of protesters were arrested during a women's protest in Freetown, dubbed as the 'Black Monday' protests. According to police, protests also took place in Lungi, Port Loko, Mile 91 and Magburaka. Hundreds of women took to the streets to protest the high cost of living, economic hardship, and economic policies in the country. Prices for fuel and basic goods have increased sharply in Sierra Leone in the past few months as a result of the global crisis, while inflation stood at 17.5 percent in February 2022, creating economic hardships for many citizens. Read more

Dozens of protesters arrested in women's 'Black Monday' protest against high fuel prices and  cost of living

Arrests, jailing of activists and silencing of dissent in Hong Kong persists despite UN review

Since March 2022, the authorities have continued to target activists under the national security law, including trustees of a fund that assisted protesters. National security trials began for 47 pro-democracy activists, while the judicial persecution of human rights lawyer Chow Hang Tung continued. The authorities arrested six activists for sedition as well as a veteran journalist. An activist was jailed for 40 months for sedition. An investigative news platform and hospital union were disbanded due to pressure from the authorities, while a pro-democracy group was forced to delete its posts online. Around the anniversary of the Tianenmen Square massacre, police banned all gatherings, patrolled parks, and arrested six people. Two veteran activists were convicted for protesting. Read more

Arrests, jailing of activists and silencing of dissent in Hong Kong persists despite UN review

New decree mandates NGOs to align their activities to governmental development priorities

On 5th January 2022, following a joint report by the Minister of Territorial Administration and Decentralisation, Payadowa Boukpessi, and the Minister of Development Planning and Cooperation, the Council of Ministers approved decree 2022-002/PR, regulating the conditions of cooperation between Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and the Government. The decree, which will come into force in April 2023, mandates NGOs to align their activities to governmental development priorities. At the risk of suspension, NGOs will be obligated to notify prefects, mayors and regional directors of Development Planning of their activities. Read more  |  Read in French

New decree mandates NGOs to align their activities to governmental development priorities

Malaysian police continue to harass protesters and activists and criminalise online expression

In recent months the police have hauled up scores of protesters to be questioned for demonstrations related to the war in Ukraine, police accountability, the death penalty, workers’ rights and judicial independence. The government has also continued to use the Sedition Act, Section 233 of the Communications and Multimedia Act (CMA) and other legal provisions to arrest individuals for online speech including an environmentalist, graphic artist and writer. The government has also failed to take effective action to protect Rohingya activists from threats and has detained activists for blocking a forced eviction. Read more

Malaysian police continue to harass protesters and activists and criminalise online expression