refusal of registration

Kazakhstan: Civil society activists intimidated, harassed and imprisoned

Fundamental freedoms have continuously been severely restricted in Kazakhstan.
Civil society activists, bloggers, protest participants and others - who criticised authorities in power - faced intimidation and harassment, including prosecution on charges brought against their legitimate exercise of freedom of expression, association and assembly. Read more

Kazakhstan: Civil society activists intimidated, harassed and imprisoned

Over 12000 NGOs ordered to stop operations, LGBTIQ community face increasing attacks

More than 12,000 charities ordered to stop their operations; attacks on the LGBTIQ community in Uganda intensify; police detain opposition leader and former president of Forum for Democratic Change (FDC), Kizza Besigye; police fire tear gas at journalists protesting against police abuse in Kampala; security operatives storm and ransack the office of the opposition FDC party Read more

Over 12000 NGOs ordered to stop operations, LGBTIQ community face increasing attacks

Kazakhstan: A tightening grip on civil society: ongoing persecution of activists across the country

During the period covered by this report, Kazakhstan witnessed reinforced persecution of civil society activists, journalists and other citizens exercising their fundamental rights. This includes the prosecution of numerous civil society activists, journalists and other individuals in retaliation for expressing their opinion, engaging in online activities or participating in peaceful demonstrations on socio-economic and political issues. The reporting period also saw the continued denial of state registration for NGOs working on issues that are sensitive to the authorities. Read more

Kazakhstan: A tightening grip on civil society: ongoing persecution of activists across the country

Uzbekistan: Reforming or Redecorating?

This special issue prepared for the CIVICUS Monitor by the Association for Human Rights in Central Asia (AHRCA) and International Partnership for Human Rights (IPHR), provides an overview reflecting some of the main developments in freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly in Uzbekistan from April 2018 to October 2019. Read more

Uzbekistan: Reforming or Redecorating?

Raid on Lawyers Collective by Indian police aimed to ‘intimidate and silence’ them

On 11th July 2019, Indian authorities raided the home and offices of noted Indian human rights defenders and lawyers Indira Jaising and Anand Grover in an alleged case of violation of the Foreign Contribution Regulation Act, 2010 (FCRA) by Lawyers Collective, an NGO they co-founded. Read more

Raid on Lawyers Collective by Indian police aimed to ‘intimidate and silence’ them

Investigative journalists suspicious of official version of Viktoria Marinova's killing

On 6th October 2018, Viktoria Marinova, a Bulgarian journalist, presenter and administrative director of the local TV channel TVN was found dead in the town of Ruse. Read more

 Investigative journalists suspicious of official version of Viktoria Marinova's killing

Political party denied registration, while court orders restrict expression

UTM party application for registration declined by the deputy registrar, while courts perceived to be restricting freedom of expression as they develop a pattern of issuing orders to prohibit public discussion of corruption cases in the media. Read more

Political party denied registration, while court orders restrict expression

Laws used to deny trade union registration and workers' right to join a union

The right to freedom of association is protected under the South Korean constitution and the administration of President Moon Jae-In has generally respected this right. However, issues persist over the denial of registration or revoking of certification of certain trade unions. Read more

Laws used to deny trade union registration and workers' right to join a union

Groups representing ethnic minorities face legal challenges when registering

Freedom of association is protected by the Greek constitution and in general citizens face no major problems or legal hindrances in establishing or running organisations. However, ethnic minorities are not legally recognised and minority groups are not allowed to register their organisations when they wish to use minority terminology in the name of the organisation. Read more

Groups representing ethnic minorities face legal challenges when registering