youth

Protests remain lethal in Guinea

On 13th June 2019, one person died and at least 28 people were injured when clashes broke out during a protest in N’Zérékoré, a city in the south of Guinea. The protest was called by the Front national pour la défense de la Constitution (FNDC; National Front for the Protection of the Constitution), a platform of opposition and some members of civil society and trade unions formed in April 2019, to demonstrate against a change of the constitution to allow president Condé a third term beyond 2020. Read more

 Protests remain lethal in Guinea


Intelligence agency coordinated with energy companies to spy on groups engaged in peaceful advocacy

In early July 2019, the B.C. Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA) released a trove of documents, known as the Protest Papers, indicating that Canada's intelligence apparatus coordinated with energy companies to spy on several groups engaged in peaceful advocacy and protest. In the period covered by this update, several protests have also taken place in defense of environmental causes, LGBTQ and religious rights, and in solidarity with Hong Kong demonstrations. Journalist Ben Makuch handed over to the police all his communications with a source, after years of court battles.

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Intelligence agency coordinated with energy companies to spy on groups engaged in peaceful advocacy


English

Journalist attacked by supporters of ruling party

As president Julius Maada Bio opened the second session of Sierra Leone's Parliament on 2nd May 2019, supporters of the ruling party - the Sierra Leone People's Party (SLPP) - physically assaulted journalist Amira Tatayea Bangura outside of the Parliament, said the Media Foundation for West Africa (MFWA). Bangura, a reporter for Sierra Express Media, was covering a protest action of opposition members of parliament, who walked out of the Parliament in protest of what they call SLPP's bad governance. Read more

Journalist attacked by supporters of ruling party


Anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism funding measures may overburden CSOs

New measures to combat terrorism funding and money laundering have caused confusion among civil society, who also have raised concerns that these measures may increase the administrative burden on CSOs and may impact on their ability to fundraise. In addition, a school lecture on gender equality and identity delivered by a LGBTI CSO, sparked debate in the parliament in April 2019. Read more

Anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism funding measures may overburden CSOs

Access to social media blocked on day of anti-government protest

Internet providers blocked the access to social media platforms such as Whatsapp, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram as a planned anti-government protest on 7th June 2019 was about to take place in Liberia's capital, Monrovia. According to digital rights CSO NetBlocks, based on network measurement data, the leading provider Lonestar also restricted Gmail and access to AP News, a news agency that reportedly published a critical article on events in the morning of 7th June, besides restrictions on the access to social media. Read more

Access to social media blocked on day of anti-government protest

People protesting energy projects continue to be targeted for their activism

People protesting energy projects continue to be targeted for their activism. For example, on 30th April 2019, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) arrested a 71-year-old man for allegedly defying a court order that prohibits demonstrations within five meters of a pipeline site for climbing a tree near the site. Read more

People protesting energy projects continue to be targeted for their activism