self censorship

Teachers strike due to pay freeze from IMF agreement

Mongolian teachers began an indefinite strike across the nation in November as part of an ongoing protest of a pay freeze due an agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Threats from authorities often lead to self-censorship. The UN called for the enactment of a law to protect human right defenders. Read more

Teachers strike due to pay freeze from IMF agreement

NetzDG law enacted to combat hate speech but raises fears of censorship

A new German law came into force on 1st October 2017 which imposes fines on social networks that do not delete illegal content, including content deemed to be hate speech. Known as the Network Enforcement Act (NetzDG), the new law has generated considerable debate over free speech rights on the internet. Read more

NetzDG law enacted to combat hate speech but raises fears of censorship

International civil society puts pressure on Sudanese authorities to respect human rights

In addition to the international pressure on Sudanese authorities to improve respect for civic freedoms, on 21st September 2017 Human Rights Watch issued a letter to the UN Human Rights Council with 21 signatories from civil society detailing the worsening conditions for civil and political rights as well as crackdowns on protesters, human rights defenders, journalists and religious minorities. The joint letter urged Sudanese authorities to address the dire human rights situation. Read more

International civil society puts pressure on Sudanese authorities to respect human rights

Arrests, detentions and murders: Crackdown on media continues

As previously featured on the CIVICUS Monitor, Turkey's unrelenting clampdown on civil society throughout 2017 has been widely condemned. In keeping with this trend of repression, on 17th October 2017 the Turkish Parliament extended emergency powers for the fifth time since July 2016. Read more

Arrests, detentions and murders: Crackdown on media continues

Civil society mounts backlash against rampant attacks on journalists

Given the concerning situation with media freedoms, Serbian media outlets and CSOs blacked out their websites or went off the air in protest on 28th September 2017 to decry the assault on media freedom. Rallying under the hashtags #StopMedijskomMraku, #ZaSloboduMedija and #StojimUzVranjske (#StopMediaDarkness, #ForMediaFreedom and #I'mWithVranjske), the groups were prompted to take action after the news portal Vranjske announced the cessation of their activities due to mounting political and economic demands from authorities. Read more

Civil society mounts backlash against rampant attacks on journalists

Refugees protest poor detention centre conditions on Australian-controlled Manus Island

A several days protest took place in Manus Island detention centre as refugees oppose their transfers to a new centre that is located in an area they claimed could be dangerous. Read more

Refugees protest poor detention centre conditions on Australian-controlled Manus Island

Public opinion against Duterte's war on drugs intensifies in wake of continued killings

As we've previously covered in the CIVICUS Monitor, President Rodrigo Duterte's bloody fifteen month campaign on drugs has left thousands of people dead over alleged drug use. Over a year since the violent crackdown began in July 2016, on 12th October 2017, President Duterte ordered the police force to desist from operations, leaving all future narcotics investigations to the smaller Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA). Read more

Public opinion against Duterte's war on drugs intensifies in wake of continued killings

Deadly repression of protests amid partial internet shutdown in Anglophone Cameroon

Soldiers killed at least eight protesters and wounded many others, during pro-independence protests on 1st October 2017 in different parts of the two Anglophone regions - North West and South West - of the country. Military forces were deployed and security forces used live ammunition and tear gas against protesters, and clashes between protesters and security forces were reported. According to a press release of the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), the Central Africa Human Rights Defenders Network (REDHAC) received reports of 30 killings after the use of real bullets and the use of teargas in the run-up to, during the protests on 1st October and afterwards, while some local activists - in conversations with CIVICUS - estimate that the real number is over 100 people killed. The protests were held on 1st October to commemorate the 56th anniversary of the proclamation of Anglophone Cameroon's independence from Britain. The protests also denounced the marginalisation of Cameroonian citizens in the Anglophone regions. In the run-up to the protests, authorities had banned gatherings larger than four people, businesses were shut down and the freedom of movement of citizens was severely restricted in the two regions. The government also closed the border with Nigeria. Read more

Deadly repression of protests amid partial internet shutdown in Anglophone Cameroon

Investigative journalism under attack: political influence impairs impartial reporting

As we've previously reported in the CIVICUS Monitor, media workers in Kosovo can face threats if reporting on politically sensitive issues. In this update we detail how the normalisation of violence against journalists has continued to fuel a climate of self-censorship. Read more

Investigative journalism under attack: political influence impairs impartial reporting

Media impartiality under the spotlight in Bosnia and Herzegovina

As we've previously featured in the CIVICUS Monitor, journalists in Bosnia and Herzegovina are reported to regularly face a situation where censorship and political pressure frequently impede their journalistic integrity. Read more

Media impartiality under the spotlight in Bosnia and Herzegovina