Uzbekistan

Some public criticism of security services surfaces but open public debate remains far-off

In the past, open discussion of the SNB's activities and its notorious head Rustam Inoyatov was taboo. However, on 22nd December 2017 President Mirziyoyev addressed the parliament on the role of the SNB, saying that the agency had frequently obstructed the functioning of the justice system and he further decried the “groundless expansion of the agency’s powers”. Read more

Some public criticism of security services surfaces but open public debate remains far-off

Uzbekistan: Some positive developments but critics and journalists still face reprisals

In this period, the Uzbekistani government remained concerned about improving its reputation in the eyes of the international community. However, the extent to which the recent reforms announced by President Mirziyoyev and his government will improve the overall human rights situation cannot yet be assessed. Read more

Uzbekistan: Some positive developments but critics and journalists still face reprisals

Human rights changes: more piecemeal than systemic

On 2nd September, after receiving an invitation from the Uzbek government, a Human Rights Watch (HRW) delegation visited Uzbekistan for the first time in seven years. HRW called on the government both publicly and in official meetings to release all those imprisoned on politically-motivated charges, put an end to torture and other forms of ill-treatment in places of detention, and cease the use of forced labour in the country’s cotton fields. Read more

Human rights changes: more piecemeal than systemic

A tentative hope for human rights improvements?

On 5th July, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Abdulaziz Kamilov, announced that the government would welcome a Human Rights Watch (HRW) delegation to Uzbekistan, tentatively indicating a level of willingness to open up the country to international human rights monitoring. Read more

A tentative hope for human rights improvements?

Harassment, detentions and mass surveillance restrict Uzbek citizens' civil and political rights

Media outlets in Uzbekistan continue to operate under close control of the authorities and independent journalists are at risk of severe reprisals for their professional activities. As reported previously the few local independent journalists who contribute information to foreign media outlets, civil society activists and other critical voices are highly vulnerable to intimidation and harassment by the authorities. Read more

Harassment, detentions and mass surveillance restrict Uzbek citizens' civil and political rights

Despite releases, conditions remain dire for HRDs in Uzbekistan

Despite a recent spate of releases of human rights defenders, the state continues to suppress dissent, sometimes through extreme measures. Read more

Despite releases, conditions remain dire for HRDs in Uzbekistan

Uzbek journalist Muhammad Bekjanov freed after 18 years in prison

In a welcome development from Uzbekistan, Muhammad Bekjanov was released from prison after spending 18 years in confinement. Read more

Uzbek journalist Muhammad Bekjanov freed after 18 years in prison

Expression

Article 29 of the country’s Constitution guarantees freedom of expression but in practice, the government has a well-established mechanism for curtailing free speech and dissent. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

Article 33 of the Constitution protects the right to assemble peacefully, however, the state uses violence to break up protests and arrest participants. Read more


Association

The right to freedom of association is strictly controlled and restricted by the government. The Code of Administrative Responsibility regulates NGOs and registering is compulsory. Read more