China

Tashi Wangchuk and other activists imprisoned as President Xi tightens grip on power

Activists were tried or convicted for their activism including Tibetan language education activist, Tashi Wangchuk. The families of four U.S.-based reporters for Radio Free Asia Uighur Service have been detained. There was a rare protest against the demolition of home of migrant communities in Beijing.
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Tashi Wangchuk and other activists imprisoned as President Xi tightens grip on power

Human rights lawyers bare the brunt of clampdown

On 25th October 2017, Chinese leader Xi Jinping was granted a second term as leader of the country's ruling communist party. Human rights watchdogs claim since Xi's ascension to leadership in 2012, Chinese authorities have increasingly stifled civil society by targeting activists, human rights lawyers, and bloggers. Since 2013, at least 42 lawyers have been subjected to violent attacks and countless others have been harassed and intimidated. Read more

Human rights lawyers bare the brunt of clampdown

China increases pressure on dissidents ahead of Communist Party Congress

Ahead of the Chinese Communist Party’s 19th Congress on 14th October 2017, fears have continued to rise over an increased clampdown on civic freedoms. Read more

China increases pressure on dissidents ahead of Communist Party Congress

Tightening the screws on dissent: harassment, coercion and censorship

As featured in the CIVICUS Monitor's last update on China, proposals for a new security law drew condemnation from both national and international CSOs. On 28th June 2017, the Chinese National People’s Congress (NPC) passed the law into force. The passage of the law enlarges Chinese authorities' already expansive arsenal of legislation that can be utilised isolate, enfeeble and besiege independent civil society groups in China. Read more

Tightening the screws on dissent: harassment, coercion and censorship

Chinese laws further suppress and squeeze out civil society

Civil society has expressed serious concern over China’s new law on national security. The National People's Congress (NPC) released the draft National Intelligence Law on 16th May 2017 for the public's commentary through 4th June. Rights group the Network of Chinese Human Rights Defenders (CHRD) believes that the law aims to conduct surveillance of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) by expanding the power of state intelligence agencies. Read more

Chinese laws further suppress and squeeze out civil society

New legislation gives Chinese authorities more control over civil society

As previously featured on the CIVICUS Monitor, the Law on the Management of Overseas NGO Activities came into effect on 1st January 2017. Read more

New legislation gives Chinese authorities more control over civil society

Bleak outlook for Chinese civil society in 2017

The passing of two new draconian laws in 2016 creates a bleak outlook for Chinese civil society at the start 2017. Read more

Bleak outlook for Chinese civil society in 2017

Chinese authorities preempt protests over smog in Chengdu

During December, environmental concerns drove protests in the southwestern city of Chengdu, as residents mobilised over poor air quality. Read more

Chinese authorities preempt protests over smog in Chengdu

Tens of Thousands Take to the Streets in Hong Kong

On the 18th of June, tens of thousands of protestors took the streets in Hong Kong in a pro-democracy rally sparked by the abduction and mistreatment of book seller Lam King-Wee in mainland China. Read more

Expression

There are no independent news sources in China which members of the public can easily access, and the state or the CCP control the majority of media outlets. The state strictly regulates critical content and prevents anything that may harm its image from being published. Read more