Cameroon

Tensions remain high as internet is restored in Angolphone areas

Internet access has been restored, as tensions remain high following recent violence in Anglophone areas and renewed attacks by Boko Haram. Read more

Tensions remain high as internet is restored in Angolphone areas

Fears of further crackdown in deepening Anglophone crisis

What began as civil society protests and civil disobedience campaigns led by lawyers and teachers' unions over the marginalisation of peoples in the two Anglophone regions of Cameroon in November 2016 spiraled out of control after a violent crackdown on the protests. Read more

Fears of further crackdown in deepening Anglophone crisis

Deadly repression of protests amid partial internet shutdown in Anglophone Cameroon

Soldiers killed at least eight protesters and wounded many others, during pro-independence protests on 1st October 2017 in different parts of the two Anglophone regions - North West and South West - of the country. Military forces were deployed and security forces used live ammunition and tear gas against protesters, and clashes between protesters and security forces were reported. According to a press release of the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), the Central Africa Human Rights Defenders Network (REDHAC) received reports of 30 killings after the use of real bullets and the use of teargas in the run-up to, during the protests on 1st October and afterwards, while some local activists - in conversations with CIVICUS - estimate that the real number is over 100 people killed. The protests were held on 1st October to commemorate the 56th anniversary of the proclamation of Anglophone Cameroon's independence from Britain. The protests also denounced the marginalisation of Cameroonian citizens in the Anglophone regions. In the run-up to the protests, authorities had banned gatherings larger than four people, businesses were shut down and the freedom of movement of citizens was severely restricted in the two regions. The government also closed the border with Nigeria. Read more

Deadly repression of protests amid partial internet shutdown in Anglophone Cameroon

Journalists and activists remain in detention on terrorism charges

Despite the gradual restoration of internet in the two Anglophone regions, many activists, lawyers and journalists who were arrested since the start of the crisis which started with a strike of lawyers in the Anglophone regions of the country in October 2016 are standing trial under the 2014 Anti-Terrorism Law, which carries a maximum sentence of death penalty. Read more

Journalists and activists  remain in detention on terrorism charges

Cameroon's crackdown continues as journalist convicted on terrorism charges

Cameroonian authorities continue to target groups in Anglophone regions of the country as RFI correspondent Ahmed Abba faces live in jail after being convicted of terrorism-related offenses. Read more

Cameroon's crackdown continues as journalist convicted on terrorism charges

Protest leaders on trial as resistence in Anglophone cameroon continues

Three leaders of the Cameroon Anglophone Civil Society Consortium are facing grave charges in a politically-motivated trial linked to ongoing protests in the South West and North West of the country. Read more

Protest leaders on trial as resistence in Anglophone cameroon continues

Judge rejects expert report in trial of RFI journalist

A judge in Cameroon gave hope to detained journalist Ahmed Abba by rejecting an expert report introduced by the prosecution in the trial against him. Read more

Tags: HRD detained
Judge rejects expert report in trial of RFI journalist

Civil society demands release of detained journalist

Civil society is repeating calls for the release of RFI journalist Ahmed Abba, who has been in detention for one year. Read more

Expression

In Cameroon, the authorities tightly control the media through the National Communications Commission (NCC), which regularly suspends media outlets and journalists when they broadcast information or opinions perceived as damaging to the state or its agents. In April 2015 alone, the NCC suspended a TV channel, a radio station and three privately-owned newspapers. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

Any person organising a peaceful public gathering in Cameroon must first get approval from the authorities. This gives the state the power to ban marches and demonstrations that it does not like, on the grounds that the assembly is likely to ‘disturb public order’. Read more