Bolivia

Journalists continue to be subject to attacks and harassment

2019 started with accusations made by the Supreme Court of Bolivia during the opening ceremony of the judicial year. Read more

Journalists continue to be subject to attacks and harassment

Concerns after National Police confirms the existence of a social media monitoring unit

On 27th November 2018, an audio was leaked through social networks in which the General Police Commander Faustino Mendoza speaks about the surveillance of messages from journalists and politicians. Read more

 Concerns after National Police confirms the existence of a social media monitoring unit

28 attacks against freedom of expression documented during the first six months of 2018

The Observatorio Boliviano de Derechos Humanos documented 28 cases of violations to freedom of the press and expression. Read more

28 attacks against freedom of expression documented during the first six months of 2018

Students continue to protest after failing to reach an agreement with the government

On 6th August, in the city of Potosi, police officers created a security perimeter around the square where President Morales was delivering a speech, action that angered some of the protesters. Read more

Students continue to protest after failing to reach an agreement with the government

One dead after police violently repress student protests

During a student protest demanding a budget increased, security forces dispersed the protest with excessive force and as a result, one student was killed. Read more

 One dead after police violently repress student protests

Lawyer threatened for advocating on behalf of indigenous communities' rights

Lawyer Nelson La Madrid received threats that he believes are due to his work defending the Guaraní indigenous communities in their effort to stop the building of a hydroelectrical project. Read more

Lawyer threatened for advocating on behalf of indigenous communities' rights

Civil society welcomes repeal of potentially restrictive Criminal Code

Civil society in Bolivia welcomed President Evo Morales' decision in January 2018 to repeal the Criminal Code, which caused widespread public discontent, strikes and protests described in the section below on Peaceful Assembly and in the previous Monitor update. Read more

Civil society welcomes repeal of potentially restrictive Criminal Code

Citizens protest Supreme Court decision that allows Morales to run for fourth term in 2019

On 28th November 2017, the Supreme Court ruled against placing limits on re-election in the country’s constitution, thereby allowing current President Evo Morales to run for a fourth term in the next election cycle in 2019. In 2016, 51.3 percent of Bolivians voted against the re-election of Morales in a public referendum. However, when the popular will was overridden by the November Supreme Court decision, three days of protests ensured in December 2017 that ended with at least 37 people arrested. Read more

Citizens protest Supreme Court decision that allows Morales to run for fourth term in 2019

Expression

Independent media and journalists are regularly attacked and operate in a hostile environment. The arrest of a Radio Líder reporter in 2015 for simply covering an anti-government protest, exemplifies this trend. In the context of Bolivia’s media environment, which has a high concentration of private sector ownership, the 2011 telecommunications law sought a more balanced distribution of broadcast licenses among the state, private companies, and local and indigenous communities. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

Although repression of protest is not a structural problem in Bolivia, there have been recent incidents where police dispersed protests using excessive force and arrested several protesters. Read more