Cambodia

Attacks on fundamental freedoms continue in the lead up to elections

New legislative changes proposed in Cambodia could further restrict civic space in the lead up to elections. The justice system continues to be misused to criminalise activists and government critics. Read more

Attacks on fundamental freedoms continue in the lead up to elections

Death knell for democracy as political opposition dissolved

As previously featured on the CIVICUS Monitor, the Cambodian authorities' disregard for civil and political freedoms has unleashed a backlash against independent media outlets, civil society groups and human rights defenders. On 17th November 2017, in a recent worrying development, the Supreme Court in Cambodia ruled to dissolve the Cambodian National Rescue Party (CNRP), effectively ending the main political opposition to Prime Minister Hun Sen in Cambodia. Read more

Death knell for democracy as political opposition dissolved

Closure of Cambodia Daily signals an escalating crackdown on dissent

The forced closure of one of Cambodia's last-remaining independent media voices represents a serious blow to civic space and freedom of expression, ahead of elections in 2018. Read more

Closure of Cambodia Daily signals an escalating crackdown on dissent

Local elections marred by irregularities and marginalisation of opposition

The recent elections in communal elections in Cambodia were overshadowed by repression of political opposition. Read more

Local elections marred by irregularities and marginalisation of opposition

Two prominent activists arrested in Cambodia as crackdown continues

On 17th August, following a Black Monday vigil in the Boeung Kak community, two prominent human rights activists, Tep Vanny and Bov Sophea were arrested and charged with “incitement.” Read more

Two prominent activists arrested in Cambodia as crackdown continues

Prominent Government Critic Kem Ley killed

On the 10th of July, prominent political opposition activist Kem Ley was gunned down Phnom Penh. As an outspoken critic of the government and grassroots organiser, Ley’s death comes at time of heightened tension between the government and political opposition; civil society and political opposition report a continued crackdown by authorities on their activities. Read more

Peaceful Assembly

People in Cambodia must give five days’ notice for most protests and 12 hours’ notice for gatherings of less than 200 persons. Additionally, a protest can only be held in the hours between 6am and 6pm. Read more

Association

Although constitutionally protected, subsidiary legislation restricts the right to freedom of association and undermines civil society operations in Cambodia. Organisations that work on land rights, women’s rights and advocacy face more serious restrictions and harassment by the government. Read more

Expression

In Cambodia, journalists often face intimidation, attacks and harassment from the government, in particular journalists that cover opposition protests and land issues. Defamation legislation includes written criticism of public officials or institutions, and journalists face jail time for failure to pay large fines that result from conviction. Read more

Overview

Since elections in 2013, civic space in Cambodia has become more repressive as respect for human rights continues to deteriorate. Recent legislation governing NGOs and trade unions compounds the situation by making it more difficult to register and operate a civil society organisation. Read more