Peaceful Assembly

Peaceful Assembly

People have a constitutional right to peaceful assembly. Read more


Peaceful Assembly in Ecuador

The freedom of peaceful assembly is constitutionally enshrined in Ecuador but no specific law regulates public gatherings. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

The constitution provides for the right to freedom of peaceful assembly. However, restrictions on this right continue to exist in various laws, in particular the Assembly and Parade Act. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

Article 103 of Latvia’s constitution protects the right of people to take part in ‘previously announced peaceful meetings, street processions, and pickets’, wording which would appear to preclude the possibility of lawful spontaneous assemblies. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

Although repression of protest is not a structural problem in Bolivia, there have been recent incidents where police dispersed protests using excessive force and arrested several protesters. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

Peaceful demonstrators are routinely detained for exercising their right to protest, in some cases even pre-emptively. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

Protests are common in Malawi and large numbers of citizens have taken to the streets on a range of issues, including to speak out against corruption and calling for a more equitable distribution of resources. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

The freedom of peaceful assembly is constitutionally enshrined and upheld in practice. Advance notification is required for gatherings in public spaces and restrictions on locations are imposed in order to guarantee free transit and circulation. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

The authorities rarely respect the freedom to assemble peacefully. Read more


Peaceful Assembly

Article 20 of the Constitution also upholds the freedom of assembly, except on the grounds of public order, safety, health and morality. Read more